Author: Gina

A Road Warrior’s Guide to Red Rock

About Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Fees/Park Passes Daily Car Fee: $7.00 Daily Motorcycle, Bicycle, Pedestrian Fee: $3.00 Scenic Drive Annual Pass: $30.00  American the Beautiful Pass (an inter-agency pass honored by the National Park Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management & Fish and Wildlife Service): $80.00 Scenic Drive Hours  The scenic drive loop is the main driving road that circles through Red Rock. It is a one way road, meaning, once you pass the Visitor’s Center you must drive the entire 13 mile loop to exit. In an effort to prevent vandalizing and other issues (as a result of its close proximity to Vegas) driving access closes each night. The road is open every day with times changing slightly according to the season. October: 6:00 AM – 7:00 PM  November – February: 6:00 AM – 5:00 PM March: 6:00 AM – 7:00 PM April – September: 6:00 AM – 8:00 PM Late Exit/Overnight Permits If you’re climbing a long route (or if there’s any chance at all you might not make it back to your car by closing time) you can request a late exit permit. They are free of charge and …

6 Must-Climb Cracks of Bishop

If you mention Bishop to a climber, chances are good that the first image that pops into their head is highball bouldering. While Bishop is best known for world class bouldering, what most climbers don’t realize is that hidden behind the hype of these giant pebbles is an amazing collection of beautiful crack climbs – and you don’t have to venture high into the Sierra to find them. Here’s a few to get you started: Sheila (5.10a) Dihedrals Area, Pine Creek Canyon This must-do moderate is located on the aesthetically angular blocks that make up the Dihedrals Area. After a thin traversing crack delivers you from the wall’s face into the corner, sinker jams lead up the middle of a large, clean-cut dihedral. As you approach the top, enjoy a short section of chimney climbing before reaching the anchors. V8 Crack (5.10d) Cardinal Pinnacle Located on a smaller formation just to the left of Cardinal Pinnacle proper, this striking crack zigs and zags through a prominent red streak that stains the granite wall. Once you reach the first …

A Road Warrior’s Guide to Bishop, CA

Every time Adam and I visit a new climbing area it means figuring out the lay of the land – where to sleep, fill up water, shower, and everything else that you need to accommodate van life. While some information can be found online, many times it takes trial and error to figure out the best or cheapest options. In my new “Road Warrior’s Guide” series I will be compiling some of the beta we’ve collected from a variety of climbing areas and towns to serve as a resource for other climbers, travelers, and van dwellers. I’m kicking off the series with Bishop, California… Camping One of the best parts of spending an extended period of time climbing in Bishop is the easy to access and affordable camping options. Pleasant Valley Pit Campground This campground is managed by the BLM and has roughly 75 sites, accommodating both tent and car campers. Cost: $2.00/night per vehicle Camping Limit: 60 days Season: Open November through early May Amenities: toilets, garbage cans, recycling cans Nearby Climbing Areas: Birdie Cracks, Happy Boulders, Sad …

The Salathé Wall, El Capitan (VI 5.9 C2)

“Harding’s route up The Nose is the boldest line up El Capitan. In contrast, the Salathé Wall is the most devious – traversing, arcing, and even rappelling on its lower half. But the reason for the devious appearance is that the Salathé Wall follows the chief line of weakness on El Capitan. In the opinion of many top climbers, it is the greatest rock climbing route in the world.” – Galen Rowell   [Excerpts written by Royal Robbins regarding the first continuous ascent of the Salathé Wall as it appears in Galen Rowell’s book, Vertical World of Yosemite, 1974.] “As we started climbing early on October 10, the sky was clear and the temperature cool. There was as yet no sign of the forecasted rain. However, later in the morning, clouds, fragments and clumps of nimbo-stratus, began moving swiftly from the south and it looked as if the Weather Bureau, which had been unsuccessfully forecasting rain for several days, might finally be right. As the clouds scudded over our heads toward the north, Tom skillfully …

Eating Crickets and Climbing Bug — I mean, Big Walls

As the population of our world increases and the amount of space decreases, there seems to be a growing concern regarding sustainability. Movies, such as Food, Inc., and books, including Michael Pollen’s An Omnivore’s Dilemma, have increased awareness about the unsustainable practices of modern farming. Many people choose to lessen their impact and contribute to a more sustainable future. While some subsist on a vegetarian or vegan diet, others buy locally raised meats. And then there’s Meghan… Meghan Curry is a 29 year-old entomologist from Texas who eats bugs. That’s right – from Mealworm Pizza to Spinach Salad with Ant Larvae, this women isn’t afraid of a few extra legs. However, Meghan hasn’t always been a proponent of eating insects. After an academic debate about global nutrition and food sustainability turned her on to the idea, she has refocused her career from studying insects to promoting and educating the West about edible insects as a serious food source (also known as entomophagy). These new goals resulted in the birth of her LLC and website Bug Vivant. …